Who approves treaties with foreign countries?

Who approves agreements with other countries?

The United States Constitution provides that the president “shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two-thirds of the Senators present concur” (Article II, section 2). Treaties are binding agreements between nations and become part of international law.

Who controls foreign policy in the US?

Under the Constitution, the President of the United States determines U.S. foreign policy. The Secretary of State, appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate, is the President’s chief foreign affairs adviser.

Who must approve treaties?

The Constitution gives to the Senate the sole power to approve, by a two-thirds vote, treaties negotiated by the executive branch.

Can US states make treaties with foreign countries?

First, only the federal government can conclude a “Treaty, Alliance, or Confederation.” States can make an “Agreement or Compact” with other states or with foreign powers but only with consent of the Congress (Article I, section 10). …

Does Congress accept executive orders?

The U.S. Supreme Court has held that all executive orders from the president of the United States must be supported by the Constitution, whether from a clause granting specific power, or by Congress delegating such to the executive branch.

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Who must be involved to implement a treaty with Indonesia?

A: Treaty. Who must be involved to implement a treaty with Indonesia? A: President and Senate. Which of these statements best represents one purpose of the State of the Union address?

What is the process for approving ambassadors judges and Cabinet members whom the President nominates appoints to government positions?

Although the Senate must confirm certain principal officers (including ambassadors, Cabinet secretaries, and federal judges), Congress may by law delegate the Senate’s advice and consent role when it comes to “inferior” officers (to the President alone, or the courts of law, or the heads of departments).